Digifish News

The Process Behind Creating The London Philharmonic Orchestra

Digifish News
The Process Behind Creating The London Philharmonic Orchestra

We are excited to share with you some behind-the-scenes information about are latest animation project. Recently, we have been thrilled to work with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Our mission was to produce two animations for them that were based on the famous and very influential composer Igor Stravinsky. Our main goal was to produce two beautiful and very visual animations that transcribed parts of his career. 

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Briefly, the first animation is about how Stravinsky enthralled audiences in the early twentieth century writing orchestral ballet scores. The second animation is about how Stravinsky’s music evolved, illustrating that by the 1920’s he had become a leading musical innovator in Paris. It gives an insight into the many collaborations he did with the leading artists/creatives of the time from Matisse and Picasso through to the costume designer,  Coco Chanel. 

We drew inspiration from the many cultural icons of the period to produce the two animations. We are delighted with the results and hope you will agree that our team produced an excellent job! 

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Zoe, our producer, explains how this project was put together and how she decided to produce these two animations. 

“I continue to be amazed by the spectrum of animation styles we have to offer and this was another unique experience. Taking inspiration from a recent project executed by animator Matt, our animator Nico, focused on the incredible detail of the ballets in which Stravinsky’s scores accompany and used a theatrical puppet-like style. Bringing to life characters and scenes, and even Stravinsky himself, for a very short time. It was a delight to pass on draft versions to the client that showcased the incredible talents of our team. Our scriptwriter worked his magic to encompass what each ballet meant in a limited timeframe and combining that with extracts of Stravinsky’s music, I hope the viewer is enthralled and enjoys watching them as much as I did.”

We’d love you to check out the two animations on our Vimeo page and hope that you’ll enjoy them as much as we did producing them!